Capital Gains Taxes – A Slippery Slope for Retirees?

After President Biden was elected, I went through his proposals and could not find any that really would affect me directly in a negative way. The one concern I noted – before the Republicans lost power in the Senate – was a change in the capital gains tax. Now that we have one-party control in Washington DC – which is always scary – talk of … Continue reading Capital Gains Taxes – A Slippery Slope for Retirees?

One Trip To Another

We are now starting week 4 of our extended Florida stay. We’re not sure what we should call this trip – it’s longer than a simple vacation but short of ‘wintering’ the whole season. We’re not ‘snowbirds’ because we don’t have property here, but we also aren’t tourists because we’ve spent so much time in Florida over the years. Yesterday morning we packed up from … Continue reading One Trip To Another

Board Meeting Busy Time

I always think of the few weeks between Halloween and Thanksgiving as relatively ‘quiet weeks’ relative to the holiday hoopla that comes in December, but it is a very busy time of the year for board work. It seems that every board I’ve worked with picks these same few weeks to get in quarterly meetings before the end of the year. Board work has been … Continue reading Board Meeting Busy Time

Optimistic Update To The 4% Rule

If you’re not familiar with the name Bill Bengen, you probably are familiar with his work.  Back in 1994, he published his Trinity Study suggesting that a 4% withdrawal rate of retirement savings would be ‘safe’ for most retirees, based on historical financial returns. Bengen – now long retired himself – has been in the news updating his thoughts on the ‘4% Rule’, as he … Continue reading Optimistic Update To The 4% Rule

What The New President Should Focus On

We voted today. Our state allows early voting and we zipped through the polling station without any delays. Now we can ignore the cacophony of competing TV commercials, lawn signs, and Facebook posts. Four years ago, I wrote a post about the 4 things the new President and Congress could focus on to best help retirees. They are all problems the government themselves created. Predictably, … Continue reading What The New President Should Focus On

Bring Your PARENTS To Work Day

Our lower level is being used as a branch office for the small software development company that our son works at.  He’s been doing the COVID-19 ‘Work From Home’ approach since he started working back on June 1st, after he moved home as a new college graduate.  We’ve tried to give him his own space and not bother him too much during office hours, but … Continue reading Bring Your PARENTS To Work Day

40 Luxuries From The 1970s

It seems life gets more luxurious the older you get. An online question on the ‘fatFIRE’ Facebook Page, prompted a lot of discussion of things that were viewed as luxuries when we were growing up in the 1970s/early-1980s.  These were the things that made you say ‘cool!’ if you saw them at someone’s house when you were a kid. I certainly thought a car with … Continue reading 40 Luxuries From The 1970s

Our National Savings Dilemma

The Washington Post columnist, Ezra Klein, once quipped that our Federal Government should be described as an “insurance company with an army”.  If you look at government spending, it is dominated by social insurance programs (Social Security & Medicare) and military spending.  Combined, these two areas account for about 75% of Washington DC’s annual outlays. The billions of dollars of COVID-19 ‘stimulus checks’ that are … Continue reading Our National Savings Dilemma

Time To Put Off Retirement?

Many are calling the COVID-19 crisis the end of the FIRE movement (financially independent, retired early).  The narrative is that no one can now afford to retire early since the market fell apart last month.  Many expect that we’ll see a huge number of people retiring much later, but I don’t think that will be the case. First, the average age of retirement has not … Continue reading Time To Put Off Retirement?