FIRE Station Fun – Get Climbing!

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I’m picking up my son at college later today.  He is coming home for a party this weekend and will be home for the summer in just a few weeks.  While he is only finishing his Freshman year at college right now, I know that soon he will be graduating for college and establishing himself in the adult world.

When I think of our experience and that of our friends, I have always felt that our early-to-mid twenties – from ages ~22-26 were the most challenging of our lives.  These are the years when you are leaving the world of education and starting to build your career.

It is also perhaps the BEST time to start smart money habits that will carry you through to financial independence and retiring early.  The sooner you start climbing towards FIRE, the sooner you will reach it.  Here is a post that outlines Seven Ideas to Save Big Money in your Twenties.

The ideas are probably as true in your twenties, as in your thirties and forties!

Image Credit: Pixabay

3 thoughts on “FIRE Station Fun – Get Climbing!

  1. Kidults. You may recall this word I coined years ago. Somehow, your children (and mine before them) intuit that they will live far longer than the generations before them. So, though their age is adult, their attitudes remain attached to their youth though their twenties. Therefore, it maybe years longer before they enter careers and climb ladders. If your son retires at the same age you did, he may have more than half his life to live in “retirement.” This may be daunting, for there are no historic or family precedents for living a hyper-extended life time. Food for thought.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes – I do remember your term, “Kidult” – and have been meaning to discuss with you. My son is quite concerned that the opportunities that his generation will have are significantly limited compared to his parents. That said, he knows that what he does is much more important than what society does to him.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Your son is right. What the individual achieves is up to the individual. Kidulthood is driven by macro forces extending lifetimes of young folks. Personally, I think the opportunities your son will have also exceed previous generations. In developed countries with declining birth rates (like the US) there will be less competition for jobs, because there are fewer to fill them. Over time, aging population with a shrinking work force will be very daunting for our nation unless we attract people to live here. That is an issue your son’s future children will face.

        Liked by 1 person

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